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environment sn environment. >> you know, jackie just mentioned coach. you will bring us through some winners and sinners too. >> everyone is in on this trade. the last five years haven't been the best on the 50e cannot my but a little retail therapy helped investors along the way. since 2007, three of the top ten of the s&p 500 are consumer discretionary companies. also, making up nearly half of the 42 component that have doubled in that time period with those bar bell retail traids providing investors with the highest returns. discounters including ross stores, tjx, dollar tree and family dollar, all gaining a hundred percent or more since the october 2007 peak, but so too have ralph lauren and fossil on the high ends. on the dow, home depot come in as the top performer. wal-mart number four. so home depot and wal-mart are two that are up double digits. consumer discretionary groups, both leading the broader s&p 500. but the bulk of retail earners are yet to hit the tape. that could change everything. especially after a sneak peek. sweel if this trade gets to rally or not. >> nice winners a
, more nationalism and an economic environment that people are not totally pessimistic, but i think they expect to see more going forward. >> an thonenny jenkins from barclay's. good to see you. thanks for joining us. pick up with barclay's. what are the expectations of what they're going to do with that transformation and job cuts? but he clearly made the point. he said when we had strong revenue growth, the banking system as a whole didn't have to worry about cost. now we've got the right costs for the new environment we're in. and is this a cross to the board picture? >> definitely. banking ultimately is such for the underlying economy. so i think it doesn't take an economy to tell us that the next couple of years is going to be choppy and not the growth we've had for the last 20 years. banking has to go back to basics. fist, think about your revenue and cost base. here on the cost base, huge improvements. they've always been unmanaged because the revenue is growing so, you know, clearly matched to pay people twice as much as we have to. today, people working from i.t. to legal t
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them.'s my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." i'm larry kudlow. in this half hour the house passes a bill to suspend the debt ceiling but the spending sequester cuts are still set to kick in on march 1st and i hope they do. now house speaker john boehner says president obama is out to annihilate the republican party. we'll talk about all that with new hampshire senator kelly ayotte and our political panel in just a few moments. >> also, big time golfers phil mickelson, tiger woods, lebron james and derek jeter are all supply siders. we'll explain that later this hour. >> i wasn't involved in the talking points process. as i understand it, as i've been told, it was a typical interagency process where staff, including from the state department all participated to try to come up with whatever was going to be made publicly available. >> that of course was secretary of state clinton today
's your take on the regulatory environment. it seems the financial services over the last couple of decades has been riding a wave of positives. deregulation, globalization. going forward economies are looking inward and regulation is only getting tougher. >> a lot of those customers you're talking about are our biggest customers, a lot of those financial institutions. as long as they are going to be facing a head wind like that, you see a cut on volume, too. they have fewer strategies they're carrying out because of all the capital charges. what i heard yesterday that i think is the biggest issue is not the breadth of the regulation, that's to be expected after a crisis, the problem is the lack of consistency across different jurisdictions. we all run international companies now. if you start to have the different regimes in different markets, it's almost impossible to run a business that way. i think that's what we have to struggle through still. that's going to be a head wind for a while, i'm afraid. >> you've got a lot of regulators in europe, in the u.s., and they're all wan
still being a drog for your business? >> you know, it certainly doesn't help that the environment here has been very difficult. there's a huge swing in sentiment over the last three or four months. the sentiment is ahead of reality at this point. but in terms of the pick up of our business, it's been meaningful and the first three or four weeks of this year have started very, very strong. >> mario draghi was there talking about banking supervision, largest banks will be supervised from frankfurt in the ecb. how does that all impact your european union? >> well, the direct impact, of course, is limited in as much as our principal regulators and supervisors are in the u.s. of course, we do operate in all of these markets and, therefore, our local units do have supplies by local rules. that goes without saying. i think the key issue is that regulatory certainty and stability and a revival testament in europe benefits the sector, benefits the markets and certainly, therefore, will benefit us indirectly. but i would say the direct impact on what we do day-to-day is somewhat limited, of cour
are this low. perhaps he needs yields to be higher to say he was forced to do it. in this environment it's not going to happen. >> to bring you back, is there any sense at all that the full in borrowing cost for the spanish government is going to feed through into the wider economy? i spoke on friday to the economic affairs minister. he told me this is what's going to happen -- now that borrowing costs are down it will feed through to the real economy. do you think that's going to happen or not? >> i hope yes because really we need some new measures. and we need some help to keep on growing again, as i was saying before. really, the -- what's going to say prime minister to all the investors. we have problems in the banking system with banking as you tell before. we have problem with the bank, and we need to -- a solution, to solve. with the meeting this morning with the president of the euro group, mr. junker, not tell any news about how will be the new measure. we are waiting and waiting and hoping that the new measures could be really strong, could be really positive. almost -- almost
-rate environment and banks effectively being unwilling to lend at these low rates. i think that is a fantastic point for the near term. more long-term, our real worry is about the exit. >> susie: real quickly, i want to ask you about the jobs report that comes out on friday because more people get jobs, it is good for the economy. >> right. >> susie: might there be a surprise that more hiring is going on? >> we do not expect any surprises, at least not any upward surprises. it is interesting, almost over any time bucket over the last year, the average job gain has been about 150,000 mer month. 150,000 -- per month. where the aggregate demand hasn't picked up, companies are not picking up the hiring. we're looking for 150,000 a month, per average. >> susie: that's kind of look warm, but thank you, tom for coming on the show. we've been talking with tom porcelli, chief mist at rbc cap >> tom: despite a strong end to the year, ford stock fell more than 4.5% today. the concern is, ford doesn't think this year will be much better than last year. the auto maker earned 31 cents a share, up from a yea
of the environment for a housing ipo, this could be a very good day. already, they had to increase the size of the offering they prize above the range, $17, putting the valuation of the company more than $500 million t is going to trade at the post right behind us, we will get the inside scoop on where this thing looks like it will open. >> california this is a california home builder, san francisco area. also southern. look, when you go to the website, they are selling them like hot cakes. >> single-family homes. >> what does that say? california home builder going public? >> my, how far we've come. >> pulte's down, jim. >> pulte is down, jim. >> thank you. thank you for that wet blanket. that wet electric blanket. >> a wet signed blanket. >> anything else you need me to tell you? >> whatever you want. >> speaking of housing, we are going to talk to fettig from whirlpool in the 11 this morning. pricing is getting better but volume is not matching at all what new homes are doing. >> surprising, low single digits, the companies make a lot of money. they have got trade rulings that are their
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
. a portfolio that does well in different environments. so much of the driver of many asset class returns is based on how events actually transpire relative to expectations. so there's a certain discounted growth rate in equities. there's a certain discounted growth rate, certain assets. you can look at what's priced in. and then what happens is, you need to have environments a quarter of your portfolio, in assets that do well, when growth is faster than expected. or, a quarter when it's slower than expected. a quarter when inflation is higher than expected and a quarter when inflation is lower than expected. so you need to create a good structured portfolio, then you can make your bets. but this is a whole conversation on how to invest. >> here's a question just about bets. you know, you're making the argument, and explaining the need to have a diversified portfolio. but most people have diversified portfolio follow the market. meaning, whatever the s&p 500 is ultimately you're going to be up or down, somewhere around there. you, and some of your peers consistently outperform the market.
to the broader manage crow environment, much more -- >> like what? >> the commodity environment we saw the last few years. certainly a better environment from a foreign exchange standpoint. multinational company earning profits. >> forex. and europe is better? >> europe, northern europe is pretty good. southern europe is still a challenge, because your previous guest would indicate. >> all right. you don't sell a lot of soap in certain countries over there. no, i'm kidding! i don't mean to -- i don't mean, you know, deodorant in one country in particular. let me think, anything else, jon, china? how's asia? >> asia is good. china is good. we grew high single digits in china. we expect that to accelerate as the year progresses. so generally our developing market business is very healthy. we grew 7% overall. 11% in the brick markets. over 20% in brazil and india. so that continues to be where a disproportionate amount of growth is coming. at the same time we're strengthening our develop market business which is starting to accelerate a little bit. >> thanks, john. hope to see you again next quart
% per year. all right? so higher rate environments don't necessarily mean, or not mutually exclusive of positive and constructive equity market returns. >> charles, i want to ask barry the same question after i ask you, but i would -- give me a number on where you think it would hurt? because i could see, i could see all the way up to 4.5% being construed as a positive. which is still such a low historical number for a ten-year, for whatever, i could see where that would help savers, it would help, you know, the return on some pension plans, and it would indicate economic growth much better than we have right now. it's something that japan wishes they had for the past 20 years, because it would at least indicate some economic activity. i can't even imagine it would be a headwind all the way up to 4.5% or 5% for equities. i don't know about the mortgage market. what do you think, charles? >> it's not just the absolute level, joe. >> but years from now, two, three years. we're going to get back there eventually, right? >> eventually i think we will. and i think if the path is a control
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
normal seasonal guidance out of respect for that environment. and what really happened, the sequential story is very, very strong. the numbers you talked about included some m&a, but we were ahead of normal expectations, particularly on you are i.t. business. and what i would tell you is there was certainly a factor of that delay and deferral we talked about in september that actually came in strong in december. >> well, look, you go over the conference calls pretty extraordinary. you talk about europe. you say a lot of it's eastern europe, uk and germany. i mean, there has been weak demand for two years, but demand grew 20%? how is that possible? >> no, it was aided by a acquisition we closed early in the quarter overall. what i would tell you is on an organic basis, our european computer business is still down double digits year-on-year, though. >> that's fair, but you did say positive things about how this month's going. for your company and also that inventory's low, which i think is a great tell of 2013. >> well, we were very proud of the cash flow for the quarter and, of course,
to establish a psychology that in some cases led to that environment. i have to believe the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. >> reporter: the decision comes nearly two and a half years after the repeal of another ban "don't ask, don't tell" which barred gays and lesbians from openly serving in the military. >> ifill: for more on how this came together, and what comes >> brown: still to come on the newshour: confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominee john kerry ... china's growth bubble ... and an online "fireside chat" with vice president biden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: president obama announced his nominees today to run two key financial regulatory agencies. he tapped mary jo white to chair the securities and exchange commission. she's a former federal prosecutor in new york, with a long record of prosecuting financial fraud and other white- collar crimes. >> if confirmed by the senate, i look forward to committing all of my energies to working with my fellow commissioners a
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
will fight a rising ten-year yield environment. we're now 197. at least as of close of business yesterday. by june, a little above 2%. by the end of the year, 2.13%. not a lot. that may be one of the ropes why wall street is not so optimistic about stocks. it's got to fight this rising treasury yield. we'll see later in the afternoon that they're more optimistic about growth. they finally increased the gdp outlook but not by very much. let's look at what wall street thinks of the effect of this quantitative easing will have. pessimistic as they have been each time we asked this question about the ability of quantitative easing to lower unemployment. only 34% say qe will help in that regard. how about when it comes to lowering mortgage rates. a little more optimism. 54% versus 42%. bond yields, evenly split, 47%, 47%. but what can qe do? it can raise stock prices. 69% say it will have an effect on raising stock prices. we want to move on now to the next bit of the survey. when will the federal reserve hike rates. these are two distribution charts. it shows where the percentage of responden
in europe. here is the outlook from cfo bob shanks. >> the environment there continues to be very, very tough. we do think, perhaps, it's a trough in '12 and '13 but we'll have to wait and see. >> that's the bad news. the good news for ford continues to be in north america. look at the profits, $1.872 billion in the fourth quarter. that's almost a billion dollars more than the fourth quarter last year. profit margins above 10%. that's impressive especially in an auto industry where 7 and 8% in north america used to be considered good. what's driving north america, stronger pricing, stronger sales. the profit margins, however, this is one thing that concerns people, the profit margins are expected to stay level in 2013, not grow in north america. still over 10% is impressive for a company a few years ago had no profit margins. >> very good point. phil, thank you. twinkies, one step closer to a new home. private firm apollo and metro polos a looking at a deal to buy from hostess. they are reporting that bid will be more than $400 million. so far everyone involved has declined to comment.
friend. >> it's a stressful environment. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh when a water main broke in the middle of the night, single digit temperatures gushing watt near a sheet of ice. subzero temps aren't all bad if you like ice boating. skimming across the ice at speeds of up to 60 miles an hour in what looks like a menny kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up, double bundle, i'm good. i have a lot of clothes on. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> reporter: ah, yes, key largo, been there many a time. let's look at the lowest temperatures overnight across the united states. check these out, mt. washington, new hampshire, 34 below, crane lake, minnesota, 27 below, sayre knack lake, new york, minus 23 and presque isle, maine, haven't been there yet, 23 below zero. out. we are balmy here by comparison. >> it's quite nice here and we should be counting our blessings. the folks we worry are the homeless. what are cities doing to help those who have absolutely nowher
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
domestic market exclusively, it's a very, very different environment with awkward rent reviews, public sector costs are highly uncompetitive right across costs such as wages. other local authority charges on retailers in particular and those with large industrial premises within the country and we also have a domestic mortgage crisis with the banks. >> now, ryanair shares are under pressure today. you can see they're trading down by better than 2%, in fact, taking the sector down, too. ez-jet is one of the worst performers on the stoxx 600 today. ryanair is roughly flat over the past seven days, so marginally higher from where we were a week ago on the back of those comments. >>> we are going to head out to tokyo as toyota reclaims the crown from gm as the world's biggest carmaker. we'll get the latest from egypt as president morsi declares a month-long state of emergency. dozens of people have been killed over anti-government protests. we'll take a view on equities, too. the dow, as we said, is on pace for its best january since 1989. and, again, for that backdrop, blackrock is report
put that point together with a weak market environment in europe, that does mean margin pinches in europe. and europe, therefore, will be in our view a drag for some years to come. even with a lower oil price than the one you just mentioned. the big positive news about that is the oil and gas arbitrage. the difference between gas prices in the united states and oil price in the rest of the world, for that matter. that arbitrage is as high as it's ever been. that's advantage dow, and we're betting against that advantage by putting $4 billion into texas and louisiana to build against that arbitrage sustaining itself. >> where -- are you hiring, andrew, in the united states? we've got a jobs report out tomorrow and you mentioned that politics has slowed down the hiring for a lot of ceos. >> well, what we're doing is to manage our way through these rocky waters, more than ever we're portfolio managing so we're putting money where there is growth and good returns on capital, like plastics, like the hydro carbons point we just made, like agro sciences. they're we're hiring. on the bus
clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric can do for you. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. stuart: the dow is on the upside, 22 points, still up, within 300 points, close to its all-time high. no eve dating of the question. just because you have a tie on doesn't mean you can debate the question, when does the dow crossed 13,000? before the day after it happened. sometimes this year. that is a huge number. play around with it and pull back and all that stuff but it will happen sometime this year and when it does watch out because people are flocking int
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)